DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20222742
Published: 2022-10-27

Rational use and cost variation analysis of antifungal drugs available in the Indian market: a pharmacoeconomic study

Pramod Kumar Manjhi, Chakrapani Kumar, Akhilesh Kumar Rana

Abstract


Background: Fungal infections are the 4th most common skin disease affecting 984 million people. Fungal infections are mostly associated with the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, corticosteroids, anticancer/immunosuppressant drugs, indwelling catheters and implants, and the emergence of AIDS. The aim of this study was to analyze the rational use, cost ratio, and percentage cost variations in different brands of the commonly prescribed antifungal drugs available in the Indian market.

Method: The maximum and minimum price of each brand of the drugs given in Indian rupees (INR) was noted by using ‘Drug Today’ (January to April 2021, volume II). The cost range, cost ratio, and the percentage cost variation for individual drug brands were calculated. The cost of tablets/capsule/injection was calculated and the cost ratio and percentage cost variation of various brands was compared.

Results: After calculation of cost ratio and percentage cost variation for each brand of antifungal agents, tab Itraconazole 100 mg had a maximum percentage cost variation of 733.33% and a cost ratio of 8.33 while tab Griseofulvin 250 mg had a minimum percentage cost variation of 16.98% and cost ratio of 1.16.

Conclusions: The present study shows there was a wide variation in the cost of the different brands of antifungal drugs manufactured by pharmaceutical companies which increases the economic burden. The clinicians prescribing these drugs should be aware of rational use and cost variation to reduce cost of drug therapy and improve patient compliance.

 


Keywords


Rational use, Fungal infection, Antifungal drugs, Cost ratio, Percentage cost variation

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