DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20192216

Prescription pattern of medicines in a tertiary care hospital: a cross-sectional study

Roshi ., Vishal R. Tandon, Brij Mohan Gupta, Sanjeev Gupta

Abstract


Background: Prescribing drugs for any disease is not complete until it is rationally done. Irrational prescriptions often lead to treatment failure, toxicity or drug interactions which may prove detrimental to the patient. Antibiotics are very much prescribed in day to day practice but their rational use prevents treatment failure, resistance.

Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital to see the antibiotic prescribing pattern. Prescriptions were screened one time from different OPDs with prior permission from the doctor attending the respective OPD.

Results: A total of 200 prescriptions were assessed out of which 121 had monotherapies prescribed, 79 had FDCs. Antibiotics were the most commonly prescribed drugs. Prescriptions having drug combinations were assessed and pantoprazole domperidone was the most commonly prescribed (32.91%).

Conclusions: Drugs should be prescribed rationally for proper therapeutic benefit. It encourages the patient to properly use the medicine and properly comply to it.


Keywords


Antibiotics, Fixed drug combinations, Generic drugs, Injectables, Prescription, Trend

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