To study cost effectiveness of topical permethrin versus oral ivermectin in patients of uncomplicated scabies

Sunita B. Chhaiya, Varsha J. Patel, Jayendra N. Dave, Dimple S. Mehta

Abstract


Background: The objective of this study was to compare the cost and effectiveness of topical permethrin and oral ivermectin in the treatment of uncomplicated scabies.

Methods: This was an open label randomized comparative study conducted in 210 patients, randomly allocated to two groups. First group received permethrin 5% cream as single application, second group received tablet ivermectin 200mcg/kg as single dose. All the patients received antihistaminic for pruritus. The patients were followed up at intervals of one, two, three and four weeks. If there were no signs of cure, the same intervention was repeated at each follow up. The cost effectiveness was calculated on the basis of total expenditure incurred on therapy.

Results: At the end of first week cure rate was 74.8% in permethrin group, 30% in oral ivermectin group. At the end of second week cure rate was 99% in permethrin group, 60% in oral ivermectin group. At the end of third week 100% cure rate was observed in permethrin while 99% in oral ivermectin group. The total cost of treatment shows that cost of tab. ivermectin was less compared to permethrin 5% but the cost to relieve itching and cost of transport was higher than permethrin 5%.

Conclusions: Topical permethrin is more cost effective than oral ivermectin in treatment of uncomplicated scabies.


Keywords


Scabies, Permethrin, Ivermectin

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References


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