Rufinamide: treatment of seizures associated with Lennox–Gastaut syndrome

Haritha Allu, Prasad R. Muduveti, Penugonda Vineela, Sathish Kalluri, Kuppili V. Saikiran, Siddhartha Lolla

Abstract


Rufinamide (RUF) is FDA-approved for adjunctive management of seizures related with Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS). This new anti-epileptic drug (AED) adds to the AEDs previously used for LGS together with valproic acid, lamotrigine, felbamate, and topiramate. Its mechanism of action includes preventive the excessive firing of sodium-dependent action potentials, but RUF also exhibits a broad spectrum of action in animal models. The plasma concentration of other AEDs does not change by the RUF. Dizziness, nausea, diplopia, and ataxia vomiting and somnolence are most common adverse effects taking place with RUF. Status epilepticus has been reported, but were uncommon (0.9%). A recent randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of RUF in patients with LGS and generalized seizures, including atypical absence and tonic-atonic seizures, showed a 32.7% median percentage decreased in total seizures and a 42.5% median percentage decreased in tonic-atonic seizures. RUF also considerably decreased seizure severity. RUF has been studied as adjunctive therapy for partial seizures in adults and adolescents. In a study of three healthy volunteers, an oral dose of 600 mg RUF recognized high absorption and monoexponential elimination with a mean half-life (t½) of 9 hrs. Excretion was mainly renal (85%) and complete (98%) within 7 days.


Keywords


Rufinamide, Lennox–Gastaut syndrome, Epilepsy, Anti-epileptic drugs

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